One Day International

One Day International (ODI) is a form of limited overs cricket, played between two teams with international status. Read everything you need to know about ODI here.

Check our Cricket API

Information about the One Day International

Each team faces a fixed number of overs, currently 50, with the game lasting up to 9 hours. The Cricket World Cup, generally held every four years, is played in this format. One Day International matches are also called Limited Overs Internationals (LOI), although this generic term may also refer to Twenty20 International matches. They are major matches and considered the highest standard of List A, limited-overs competition.

 

One Day International History

The international one day game is a late-twentieth-century development. The first ODI was played on 5 January 1971 between Australia and England at the Melbourne Cricket Ground. In the late 1970s, Kerry Packer established the rival World Series Cricket competition, and it introduced many of the features of One Day International cricket that are now commonplace, including coloured uniforms, matches played at night under floodlight with a white ball and dark sight screens, and for television broadcast, multiple camera angles, effects microphones to capture sounds from the players on the pitch and on-screen graphics. The first matches with coloured uniforms were the WSC Australians in wattle gold versus WSC West Indians in coral pink, played at VFL Park in Melbourne on 17 January 1979. Matches played with coloured kits, and a white ball became more commonplace over time, and the use of white flannels and a red ball in ODI’s ended in 2001.

The ICC international cricket’s governing body, maintains the ICC ODI Rankings for teams, batsmen, bowlers and all-rounders. Currently, New Zealand is the top-ranked ODI side.

 

Teams with ODI status

The International Cricket Council (ICC) determines which teams have ODI status. Meaning that any match played between two such teams under standard one-day rules is classified as an ODI. The twelve Test-playing nations (which are also the twelve full members of the ICC) have permanent ODI status. The nations are listed below, with the date of each nation’s ODI debut after gaining full ODI status shown in brackets.

  • Australia (5 January 1971)
  • England (5 January 1971)
  • New Zealand (11 February 1973)
  • Pakistan (11 February 1973)
  • West Indies (5 September 1973)
  • India (13 July 1974)
  • Sri Linka (13 February 1982)
  • South Africa (10 November 1991)
  • Zimbabwe (25 October 1992)
  • Bangladesh (10 October 1997)
  • Afghanistan (5 December 2017)
  • Ireland (5 December 2017)

 

Temporary ODI status

Between 2005 and 2017, the ICC granted temporary ODI status to six other teams (known as Associate Members). In 2017 this was changed to four teams, following the promotion of Afghanistan and Ireland to Test status (and permanent ODI status). The ICC had previously decided to limit ODI status to 16 teams. Teams earn this temporary status for a period of four years based on their performance in the ICC World Cup Qualifier, which is the final event of the ICC World Cricket League. In 2019, ICC increased the number of teams holding Temporary ODI status to eight. The following eight teams currently have this status.

  • Scotland (from 27 June 2006 until the 2023 Cricket World Cup Qualifier)
  • United Arab Emirates (from 1 February 2014 until the 2023 Cricket World Cup Qualifier)
  • Nepal (from 1 August 2018 until the 2023 Cricket World Cup Qualifier)
  • Netherlands (from 1 August 2018 until the 2023 Cricket World Cup Qualifier)
  • Namibia (from 27 April 2019 until the 2023 Cricket World Cup Qualifier)
  • Oman (from 27 April 2019 until the 2023 Cricket World Cup Qualifier)
  • Papua New Guinea (from 27 April 2019 until the 2023 Cricket World Cup Qualifier)
  • United States (from 27 April 2019 until the 2023 Cricket World Cup Qualifier)

One Day International teams

The Australia men’s national cricket represents Australia in men’s international cricket. As the joint oldest team in Test cricket history, playing in the first-ever Test Match in 1877. The team also plays One-Day International (ODI) and Twenty20 International (T20I) cricket, participating in both the first ODI, against England in the 1970-71 season and the first T20I, against New Zealand in the 2004-05 season, winning both games. The team draws its players from teams playing in the Australian domestic competitions.

The England cricket team represents England and Wales in international cricket. England, as a founding nation, is a Full Member of the International Cricket Council (ICC) with Test, One Day International (ODI) and Twenty20 International (T20I) status. Until the 1990s, Scottish and Irish players also played for England as those countries were not yet ICC members in their own right. England and Australia were the first teams to play a Test match (15-19 March 1877), and along with South Africa, these nations formed the Imperial Cricket Conference on 15 June 1909.

The New Zealand national cricket team represents New Zealand in men’s international cricket. Named the Black Caps, they played their first Test in 1930 against England in Christchurch, becoming the fifth country to play Test cricket. From 1930 New Zealand had to wait until 1956, more than 26 years, against the West Indies at Eden Park in Auckland for its first Test victory. They played their first ODI in the 1972-1973 season against Pakistan in Christchurch. The New Zealand cricket team became known as the Blackcaps in January 1998 after its sponsor at the time, Clear Communications, held a competition to choose a name for the team. This is one of many national team nicknames related to the All Blacks.

The Pakistan national cricket team often referred to as the Shaheens, Green Shirts, Men in Green and Cornered Tigers, is administered by the Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB). The team is a Full Member of the International Cricket Council and participates in Test, One Day International (ODI) and Twenty20 International cricket matches. Pakistan was given Test status on 28 July 1952 and made its Test debut against India at Feroz Shah Kotla Ground, Delhi, in October 1952, with India winning by an innings and 70 runs.

The West Indies cricket team, nicknamed the Windies and Men in Maroon, is a multi-national men’s cricket team representing the mainly English-speaking countries and territories in the Caribbean region and administered by Cricket West Indies. The players on this composite team are selected from a chain of fifteen Caribbean nation-states and territories. As of 13 May or 2021, the West Indies cricket team is ranked seventh in Tests and ninth in both ODIs and T20Is in the official ICC rankings.

The India men’s national cricket team, also known as Team India or the Men in Blue, represents India in men’s international cricket. It is governed by the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI), and is a Full Member of the International Cricket Council (ICC) with Test, One Day International (ODI) and Twenty20 International (T20I) status. Cricket was introduced to India by British sailors in the 18th century, and the first cricket club was established in 1792. India’s national cricket team played its first Test match on 25 June 1932 at Lord’s, becoming the sixth team to be granted test cricket status. For its first Test victory, India had to wait until 1952, almost twenty years.

The Sri Lanka National Men’s Cricket Team, nicknamed The Lions, represents Sri Lanka in men’s international cricket. It is a Full Member of the International Cricket Council (ICC) with Test, One-Day International (ODI) and T20 International (T20I) status. The team first played international cricket in 1926-27 and was later awarded Test status in 1981, which made Sri Lanka the eighth Test cricket playing nation. The team is administered by Sri Lanka Cricket.

The South Africa national cricket team, also known as the Proteas, represents South Africa in men’s international cricket and is administered by Cricket South Africa. South Africa is a Full Member of the International Cricket Council (ICC), with Test, One-Day International (ODI) and Twenty20 International (T20I) status. Its nickname derives from South Africa’s national flower, Protea cynaroides, commonly known as the King Protea. South Africa entered first-class and international cricket at the same time when they hosted an England cricket team in the 1888-1889 season. At first, the team was no match for Australia or England but having gained experience and expertise, they were able to field a competitive team by the first decade of the 20th century.

The Zimbabwe national cricket team, also known as Chevrons, represents Zimbabwe in men’s international cricket and is administered by Zimbabwe Cricket (formerly known as the Zimbabwe Cricket Union). Zimbabwe has been a Full Member of the International Cricket Council (ICC) since 1992. As of March 2022, Zimbabwe is currently ranked 10th in Tests, 13th in One Day Internationals (ODIs) and 11th in Twenty20 Internationals (T20Is) by the ICC.

The Bangladesh men’s national cricket team, popularly known as The Tigers, is administered by the Bangladesh Cricket Board (BCB). It is a Full Member of the International Cricket Council (ICC) with Test, One-Day International (ODI) and T20 International (T20I) status. It played its first Test match in November 2000 against India with a 10 wicket loss in Dhaka, becoming the tenth Test-playing nation. Bangladesh became an associate member of the ICC in 1977 and competed in six ICC Trophies, the leading ODI competition for non-Test playing nations.

The Afghanistan men’s national team represents Afghanistan in international cricket. Cricket has been played in Afghanistan since the mid-19th century, but it was only in the early 21st century that the nation began to enjoy success. The Afghanistan Cricket Board was formed in 1995 and became an affiliate member of the International Cricket Council (ICC) in 2001 and a member of the Asian Cricket Council (ACC) in 2003. The team is ranked 9th in Twenty20 International (T20I) cricket as of January 2021 and holds the world record for the highest ever T20I score, with their score of 278/3 against Ireland at Dehradun on 23 February 2019.

The Ireland cricket team represents all of Ireland in international cricket. The Irish Cricket Union, operating under the brand Cricket Ireland is the sport’s governing body in Ireland and organises the international team. Ireland participates in all three major forms of the international game: Test, One-Day International (ODI) and Twenty20 International (T20I) matches. They are the 11th Full Member of the International Cricket Council (ICC), and the second Full Member from Europe, having been awarded Test status, along with Afghanistan, on 22 June 2017.

Cricket API Plans

When you want access to all Cricket Leagues we have, the Cricket Enterprise Plan would be best suitable for you. You can find anything you need to know about using our API on our extensively described Documentation pages and Postman collection.